NOOZHAWK Article: Local Police Receive New Patrol Cars (October 6th, 2014)

Originally posted on Corporate Whoredoms & the American Kleptocracy:

Here is the Article:

http://www.noozhawk.com/article/local_police_new_patrol_cars_20141005

My Responses:

The starting salary of an S.B. Police Officer is, according to Noozhawk in 2012:

“The average 2012 salary and overtime for an Santa Barbara police officer was $99,084 per year, with sergeants bringing in $130,476 annually. A top-step police officer can cost the city $180,830 per year in salary, benefits and taxes.”

Most of us who are not a part of the Military Industrial Complex, which now apparently wholly encompasses Police Departments, paying for it with OUR Tax dollars, are simply left to languish in Debt Servitude, mired in the Reagan-esque “Trickle-Down” LIE, the new “Service” Economy, i.e. Sharecropper System.

America is “Great” if and only if you’re rich;
And only if you truly enjoy continual Wars of American Aggression;
And only if you love Bank Fraud;
And only if you love gigantic monopolistic corporations that pay ZERO dollars in Taxes;
And only…

View original 3,444 more words

Report From #BlackLivesMatter Convening In Cleveland Posted by PopularResistence.org

Black Lives Matter

Report From #BlackLivesMatter Convening In Cleveland

Participants in the Cleveland convening of the Movement for Black Lives take part in an impromptu dance and drumming circle on the campus of Cleveland State University.

Black Lives Matter

(Photo: Movement for Black Lives, Laylah Amatullah Barrayn)

Coming together across different ideologies, generations, geographies and experiences, participants in the Movement for Black Lives have the potential, the brilliance and the power to get free and to stay free.

More than 1,500 Black people came together in Cleveland, Ohio, last week for the Movement for Black Lives convening. It was a gathering designed to bring Black people together across different fault lines in order to continue to solidify our vision, our purpose and our relationships with one another.

The convening, which began on July 24, was an opportunity to ask ourselves the question of what a world would look like in which Black lives actually mattered – and not just some Black lives, but all Black lives. This question is increasingly important in a context where, as author and public policy leader Heather McGhee so eloquently stated, Black lives were the first currency of this nation.

More importantly, the convening in Cleveland offered an opportunity for us to be together in community and solidarity in ways that are wholly discouraged by a racialized capitalist society – an opportunity for us to practice in real time the strategies and tactics that we need to build a coordinated movement that can get us closer to liberation.

This is more important than one might realize. On the surface, the concept of being in “community” and “solidarity” may seem esoteric. But in fact, this practice of solidarity is an essential step toward liberation. Solidarity means Black people of all genders, geographies and generations coming together across class to love each other in a country that traded and sold our bodies for profit. Solidarity means Black people loving each other in a country that designed state programs like COINTELPRO that were intended specifically to dismantle and disrupt once-powerful and vibrant Black liberation organizations and movements.

The consequences of those dynamics – racialized capitalism and state-sanctioned violence – have meant that Black movements for liberation, which have sparked the imaginations of many other oppressed and marginalized communities, have been so weakened and diminished that it has impacted our ability to be powerful together. Given that, we could say that Black love – building community and solidarity – is a liberatory act and an act of resistance.

As we approach the one-year anniversary of the murder of 18-year-old Michael Brown, the Movement for Black Lives convening was also an opportunity to assess our strength and cohesion as a movement. What’s the state of the organizing and the movement-building and the infrastructure in St. Louis, especially as the news cameras have left Canfield Drive, where Brown was murdered, and now reappear in places like the Gilmore Homes in Baltimore, Maryland, where Freddy Gray was murdered?

People in St. Louis loved their brother Mike Brown so much that when he was murdered in August 2014 and bled to death in the middle of the street on Canfield Drive, just steps away from his mother’s home, they sparked a resistance movement that impacted this country and the world in profound ways. The willingness of young people to reject respectability politics, to confront power (in the form of police) directly and militantly, and even to challenge the notion that the only place that resistance can happen is within formalized nonprofit organizations has re-infused the movement with new energy and ideas, new tactics and most importantly, more people.

We are reminded on the heels of this month’s historical convergence of Black people that we have come so far, and that at the same time, we have to challenge ourselves to go further. If it weren’t for the ongoing strength of the resistance movement in Ferguson, the national Movement for Black Lives might risk lacking the strength we need to push forward in ever-growing strength, cohesion and coordination. We need to continue building our strength throughout the country so that a reinvigorated Black liberation movement can be sustained.

Let us not forget that assessing our strength is about more than how many of us can come together, despite racialized capitalism and state-sponsored programs designed to keep us disorganized and in disarray. Our strength lies in how well we take care of one another when the cameras are gone, when the buzz has died down and when the trending on social media ends.

Today, we should be proud of the Movement for Black Lives and all who have contributed to it. And as we celebrate, let us renew our commitment to strengthening the activists, protestors, organizers and institutions that make this movement possible. If we are successful, as hip hop artist Kendrick Lamar so eloquently said, “We gon’ be alright.”

Bill Black: The OSU Marching Band Exemplifies Why Economists Err by Ignoring Culture (Posted on NAKED CAPITALISM August 2, 2015 by Lambert Strether)

Bill Black: The OSU Marching Band Exemplifies Why Economists Err by Ignoring Culture
Posted on August 2, 2015 by Lambert Strether

Lambert here: This is a short but important post. In the headline, Black says “culture,” a superset of the “criminogenic environment” concept he uses elsewhere. We often think of culture as far away, or perhaps even practiced in concert halls or museums; and we may think of a “criminogenic environment” as something created only in corporate environments. In fact, our intimate daily encounters are all structured by (among other things) culture, and — as the thousands who went to work creating fake documents during the foreclosure crisis knew — a “criminogenic environment” can be right next door. Black’s case study of corrupt culture Ohio State University Marching Band drives both points home. “If men were angels….”

By Bill Black, the author of The Best Way to Rob a Bank is to Own One and an associate professor of economics and law at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. Originally published at New Economic Perspectives

The Ohio State University (OSU) marching band is back in the news, which is a very bad thing. Sometimes a story that has no obvious connection to economics provides an understandable example of why economic analysis is often so poor. The OSU band story is featured in the Wall Street Journal in an article entitled “Holocaust Victims Mocked in Ohio State Band Parody Songbook.” The WSJ has a copy of the “OSU songbook” and the title is not an overstatement. The lyrics mock the Jewish victims in graphic terms. The lyrics are also juvenile and lame. The author(s) of the songbook have no future in any creative activity. The lyrics to other songs are homophobic and equally lame. I won’t quote the lyrics and spread the hate.

Band members were also urged to keep the book secret. “Take it with you on trips and to parties. But never leave this out of your sight,” it says. “This book is for OSUMB members only, Past and Present. If they were not out on the field in front of 105,000 crazy fans in black (OK, navy blue) wool uniforms, they do not deserve to see this.”

The existence of a band songbook of crude parodies first came to light in July 2014 after a university-led investigation into the band’s culture. At the time the director, Jon Waters, along with many students and alumni from the band, said the songs—which also featured lyrics about rape, bestiality and homosexuality—had been out of circulation for years and were seldom sung.

But that attempted cover up turned out to be a lie. OSU removed Waters as band director even before the cover up and lies were discovered. At the time OSU acted, it knew that the culture of the OSU marching band was an embarrassment to OSU. OSU now knows additional facts. It knows that there was an organized cover up by band members that succeeded in deceiving the first set of OSU investigators. It knows that the rot indicated problems at the top. Waters was not simply the band director, he was the former assistant director and a former member of the band that knew personally of earlier variants of the songbook.

We also know from the songbook’s directions that the band members knew that it was disgusting and would bring shame and disrepute on the band and OSU if it ever became public. The OSU marching band is huge and we are talking about many years of membership. Hundreds of band members kept the secret, including some lying to the initial investigators, rather than denouncing the puerile, hateful lyrics. Notice how the author(s) of the songbook directions sought to build a corrupt culture: anyone who is not a member of the band does not “deserve to see this.” “Deserve” is used to build exclusivity and special, privileged status. Within this privileged status the normal rules of society, such as not mocking the mass murder of Jews by the Nazis, no longer apply.

This becomes even more apparent in another part of the introduction to the songbook.

The songbook, which was reviewed by The Wall Street Journal, included an introduction that noted “Goodbye Kramer” as a new addition, along with a parody of the fight song of University of Nebraska, then a new member of the Big Ten conference. An introduction to the book said: “Some of these [songs] may be offensive to you. If so, you can either ignore them, or you can suck it up, act like you got a pair and have a good time singing them.”

“Goodbye Kramer” is song mocking Jews murdered in the Nazi extermination camps. The song about U. Nebraska is an embarrassingly unfunny exercise in hate for gays. But my focus is on the last clause of the last sentence – “act like you got a pair and have a good time singing them.” The OSU marching band, of course, includes women. They too are being advised that the band’s culture is proudly and boorishly male and mock brave. The mock bravery consists of being deliberately (but secretly) nasty and bigoted.

There are three key points that conventional economists ignore that are illustrated by this latest sadness out of OSU. First, it is easy to build a perverse culture that can last for many years even though the participants know that they are acting in a shameful fashion. Second, such a culture can only persist with bad or failed leaders. Third, a corrupted culture can lead people who are not intrinsically corrupt or evil to do things they know are wrong. There is no reason to believe that OSU marching band members were sociopaths. They likely exemplified “normal.”

That normality should be the scary part to economists. None of the OSU band directors set out to create a corrupt culture. A corrupt CEO running a “control fraud” deliberately creates a corrupt culture by using all of his immense powers to create powerful incentives for employees and officers to aid that fraud. The CEO can decide who is hired, fired, promoted, praised, ridiculed, and made rich. OSU’s marching band’s perverse culture was successfully constructed and maintained for years by a handful of pathetic teens who were desperately unfunny purveyors of hate. Economists err by ignoring the CEOs ability to shape and maintain the corrupt cultures that drive our recurrent, intensifying financial crises.

U.S. Government Officials Oaths of Office…

Article VI of the Constitution requires all government officials to take a sworn oath “to support this Constitution;” 5 U.S.C. 3331 specifies the language of the oath for federal government officials.

According to this statute, officials must “solemnly swear (or affirm)” that they “will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic” and that they “will bear true faith and allegiance to the same.”

 

Scott Walker et al should go to PRISON.

STOP MASS INCARCERATION: #RiseUp October 24 NYC

Message from STOP MASS INCARCERATION

We can’t stand by and watch!

No Neutrality! No Bystanders!
Draw the Line!
Drop what you’re doing!
Come to the Kick-off Meeting
for #RiseUpOctober 24 NYC
This Sunday, 2 PM, Oakland

If the brutal execution of Sam Dubose was the only outrage by law enforcement, that would be enough to be out in the streets.

BUT…

Because police STILL kill Black and Brown children for playing with toy guns and choke Black men to death in Staten Island and Mississippi and then curse them at their last dying breath, because cops disappear a young Black woman into a Texas county jail and “somehow” she doesn’t come out alive, because 26 of these mad dogs stomp a young man for riding his bike the wrong way in Philly, because they shoot down and murder Latinos who have their hands in the air in LA or maybe throw a rock in Washington state while backing up… and it’s all on video and NOTHING IS DONE, still NOTHING IS DONE…

While the politicians now promise the moon, their police have killed 669 to date this year, adding to the thousands they have already killed, and the system STILL keeps millions in prisons that bulge like the slave ships, and lock down and pen up whole communities… and there’s STILL one chance in three that the Black baby boy born today will end up in those cages… and talk is cheap but NOTHING HAS BEEN DONE…
We have to either go forward—taking the resistance to another level—
or we will surely go backwards…

Drop what your are doing and
JOIN US!

2501 Harrison St./27th Street, Oakland
Community Youth Fellowship [CYF] Room

Important Notice!
BART trains will not be running across the Bay on Sat. or Sun.
To Carpool from San Francisco,
meet in parking lot behind Wallgreens on Mission/16 St. at 12:30pm

Copyright © 2015 Stop Mass Incarceration Bay Area, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email, because you met us and signed up on our email list

Our mailing address is:
Stop Mass Incarceration Bay Area
2501 San Pablo
Berkeley, CA 94702

 

Message from STOP MASS INCARCERATION: Kick-Off Meeting for #RiseUpOctober Sunday, August 2nd, 2 PM OAKLAND

Kick-Off Meeting for #RiseUpOctober
Which Side are You on?

Be There!
Sunday, August 2nd, 2 PM
First Congregational Church, Oakland
27th and Harrison St
(Across from Whole Foods, Harrison Street level Entrance)
Will you be at this Meeting? (click here) and invite others

Why come out ?
Why stop what you are doing and throw into this?
Because police STILL kill Black and Brown children for playing with toy guns and choke Black men to death in Staten Island and Mississippi and then curse them at their last dying breath, because cops disappear a young Black woman into a Texas county jail and “somehow” she doesn’t come out alive, because 26 of these mad dogs stomp a young man for riding his bike the wrong way in Philly, because they shoot down and murder Latinos who have their hands in the air in LA or maybe throw a rock in Washington state while backing up… and it’s all on video and NOTHING IS DONE, still NOTHING IS DONE…

Why October 24? Because politicians now promise the moon while the system STILL keeps millions in prisons that bulge like the slave ships, and lock down and pen up whole communities… and there’s STILL one chance in three that the Black baby boy born today will end up in those cages… and talk is cheap but NOTHING HAS BEEN DONE…

Why October 24? Because you know it now, you’ve seen it, and you can’t be neutral, you can’t sit this out. Because last year people rose up and said NO MORE and that was great, that was fresh air at last. But it was all just a start and now they are trying to snuff this out with more murders and more lies, with jail terms and sweet talk and crumbs and snark—or else they try to change the subject to anything but police terror and the righteous struggle against it. And meanwhile the plague still rages… meanwhile the machinery of genocide grinds on, tearing and chewing up thousands each day, draining or wearing away, or blowing away the lives of tens of millions more over decades.

We have to either go forward—
taking the resistance to another level—
or we will surely go backwards…
Copyright © 2015 Stop Mass Incarceration Bay Area, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email, because you met us and signed up on our email list

Our mailing address is:
Stop Mass Incarceration Bay Area
2501 San Pablo
Berkeley, CA 94702